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Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   Stream Ecology

 Title Abbreviation:   STREAM ECOLOGY

 Department:    ENVC

 Course #:    122

 Credits:    5

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    5.5

 CIP:    150594

 EPC:    615

 REV:    2013


 Course Description  

Introduction to physical, chemical and biological components of lotic systems and their anthropogenic impacts. Sampling techniques, lab procedures, water quality and stream habitat will be evaluated. Perform bioassessment. Exploration of global and cultural issues in relation to rivers.

 Prerequisite  

Prerequisite: ENVC 112 or department chair approval. Proof of current tetanus vaccination (10 years) is required.

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 44

Lab: 22

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Vocational Preparatory Required for ATA degree  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
N/A

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify necessary water quality and habitat parameters to be assessed.
  2. Understand and work with stream parameters qualitatively and quantitatively.
  3. Perform water quality tests in the field and in the laboratory.
  4. Identify land uses, water uses and their effects on stream and rivers.
  5. Understand and identify cultural issues regarding water quality, stream habitat, and uses on a local and global scale.
  6. Critical thinking skills developed through homeworks.
  7. Perform bioassessments of streams.

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

1. Information Literacy

Definition: Recognizing when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
1.1 Determine the extent of information needed.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and facts related to a specific discipline.
2.3 Identify, interpret, and evaluate pertinent data and previous experience to reach conclusions.

3. Communication

Definition: Understanding and producing effective written, spoken, visual, and non-verbal communication.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
3.1 Recognize, read, and comprehend academic and/or professional writing.
3.2 Recognize, produce and demonstrate appropriate interpersonal, group, and public speaking skills.
3.4 Produce academic and/or professional writing and integrate it into written and spoken projects.

6. Individual Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding, managing, and taking responsibility for one’s learning and behavior in varied and changing environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
6.3 Apply successful organizational strategies of planning, goal setting, prioritizing, resolving conflict, and managing time to specific goals and/or projects.

8. Mathematical Reasoning

Definition: Understanding and applying concepts of mathematics and logical reasoning in a variety of contexts, both academic and non-academic.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
8.2 Correctly apply logical reasoning and mathematical principles to solve problems.
8.3 Interpret information and reasoning expressed mathematically (for example in spreadsheets, diagrams, charts, formulas, etc.).

9. Scientific Literacy

Definition: Understanding scientific principles, and analyzing and applying scientific information in a variety of contexts.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
9.2 Demonstrate their understanding of the principles of scientific methods, analysis, and reasoning.

10. Technology

Definition: Understanding the role of technology in society and using technology appropriately and effectively.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
10.3 Use technology appropriate to the context and task to effectively retrieve and manage information, solve problems, and facilitate communication.

Course Contents

  1. Channels and flow, water chemistry.
  2. Physical factors.
  3. Primary production.
  4. Trophic relationships.
  5. Predation, herbivory, competition.
  6. Drift.
  7. Organic matter.
  8. Nutrients.
  9. Anthropogenic impacts.