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Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   Ecology of Ecosystem Edges/Ecotones

 Title Abbreviation:   ECOSYSTEM EDGES/ECOTONES

 Department:    ENVC

 Course #:    221

 Credits:    3

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    3.75

 CIP:    150594

 EPC:    615

 REV:    2014


 Course Description  

Importance of ecotones between freshwater systems and upland areas. Essential biological processes shaping ecological properties of ecotones at various scales of time and space. Students must conduct research and give a short seminar.

 Prerequisite  

Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and 202 or department chair approval.

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 33

Lab: 11

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Vocational Preparatory Required for ATA degree  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
N/A

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the biological values of ecotones at different temporal and spatial scales.
  2. Apply the ecotone concept when solving fish and wildlife problems during landscape restoration of biodiversity.
  3. Recognize different cultural and socio-economic constraints in ecotone management.

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and facts related to a specific discipline.
2.8 Describe how one’s own preconceptions, biases and values affect one’s response to new and ambiguous situations.

3. Communication

Definition: Understanding and producing effective written, spoken, visual, and non-verbal communication.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
3.2 Recognize, produce and demonstrate appropriate interpersonal, group, and public speaking skills.
3.3 Demonstrate effective listening skills.
3.4 Produce academic and/or professional writing and integrate it into written and spoken projects.
3.6 Recognize, comprehend, and use visual communication appropriate to a given context.

4. Community & Cultural Diversity

Definition: Recognizing the value of human communities and cultures from multiple perspectives through a critical understanding of their similarities and differences.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
4.3 Understand the historically and socially constructed nature of—and the meanings attributed to—human differences.
4.4 Demonstrate effective communication across differences in human communities and cultures.

5. Global & Local Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding the complexity and interdependence of, and stewardship responsibilities to, local and global communities and environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
5.2 Identify diverse communities and their shared/competing interests and develop strategies for prevention and resolution of conflict.

6. Individual Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding, managing, and taking responsibility for one’s learning and behavior in varied and changing environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
6.3 Apply successful organizational strategies of planning, goal setting, prioritizing, resolving conflict, and managing time to specific goals and/or projects.

7. Aesthetics & Creativity

Definition: Interpreting human experience through engagement with creative processes and aesthetic principles.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
7.2 Demonstrate knowledge of aesthetic principles.

8. Mathematical Reasoning

Definition: Understanding and applying concepts of mathematics and logical reasoning in a variety of contexts, both academic and non-academic.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
8.3 Interpret information and reasoning expressed mathematically (for example in spreadsheets, diagrams, charts, formulas, etc.).

9. Scientific Literacy

Definition: Understanding scientific principles, and analyzing and applying scientific information in a variety of contexts.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
9.3 Analyze, apply, and communicate scientific concepts and principles in context (for example, in technological, personal, and/or professional situations).
9.5 Demonstrate an understanding of the political and ethical issues in science.

10. Technology

Definition: Understanding the role of technology in society and using technology appropriately and effectively.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
10.3 Use technology appropriate to the context and task to effectively retrieve and manage information, solve problems, and facilitate communication.

Course Contents

  1. The ecotone perspective.
  2. The importance of land-water ecotones.
  3. Landscape disturbances and lotic systems.
  4. Functions of ecotones in fluvial systems.
  5. The characteristics of wetland ecotones.
  6. The role of ecotones in aquatic landscapes.
  7. The socio-economic value of ecotones.