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Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   History of the Northwest Indians: D

 Title Abbreviation:   HISTORY NW INDIANS: D

 Department:    ETHNC

 Course #:    111

 Credits:    5

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    5

 CIP:    050202

 EPC:    n/a

 REV:    2014


 Course Description  

An introduction to the many different indigenous communities inhabiting the Northwest and the significant variety of cultural and environmental experiences and adaptations.

 Prerequisite  

None

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 55

Lab: 0

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Academic Social Sciences  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
UW T GER
WWU T GER

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand how the indigenous peoples first arrived in the Northwest (NW) and adapted to and flourished in the many different landscapes and environments;
  2. Recognize regional similarities but local differences in indigenous NW cultures.
  3. Describe social, political, cultural, and artistic differences among indigenous peoples living in the NW.
  4. Understand major contemporary issues emerging from two centuries of conflict between indigenous communities of and Euro-Americans

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

0. Application and Integration

Definition: Applying information from one or more disciplines and/or field experiences in new contexts (Outcome 0.1); developing integrated approaches or responses to personal, academic, professional, and social issues (Outcomes 0.2-0.5).

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
0.3 Identify and evaluate the relationships among different perspectives within a field of study and among different fields of study.

1. Information Literacy

Definition: Recognizing when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
1.3 Evaluate information and its sources critically.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.2 Analyze issues and develop questions within a discipline.

4. Community & Cultural Diversity

Definition: Recognizing the value of human communities and cultures from multiple perspectives through a critical understanding of their similarities and differences.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
4.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and issues associated with the diverse perspectives of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, and culture.
4.2 Understand, value and respect human differences and commonalities as they relate to issues of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and culture.
4.3 Understand the historically and socially constructed nature of—and the meanings attributed to—human differences.

5. Global & Local Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding the complexity and interdependence of, and stewardship responsibilities to, local and global communities and environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
5.1 Understand the impact of their own and other’s actions on local/global communities and environments and how those communities/environments affect them in turn.
5.2 Identify diverse communities and their shared/competing interests and develop strategies for prevention and resolution of conflict.

6. Individual Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding, managing, and taking responsibility for one’s learning and behavior in varied and changing environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
6.4 Use self-reflection to recognize and define a sense of self-identity in personal, social/gender, and/or cultural/global terms and in relationship to others.

9. Scientific Literacy

Definition: Understanding scientific principles, and analyzing and applying scientific information in a variety of contexts.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
9.4 Use scientific concepts and principles to understand the natural world, human behavior and culture, and relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world.

Course Contents

  1. Using archaeological, historical, and oral records study how the indigenous people first arrived on the PNWC and adapted to the many maritime environments, including saltwater, freshwater, mountain, plateau and prairie.
  2. A survey of approximately 30 different indigenous societies of the NW and the many similarities and differences in social, political, religious, economic, and artistic expression.
  3. An analysis of major events illustrating contact and evolving inter-dependence between Euro-Americans and the indigenous peoples of the NW.
  4. An exploration of contemporary issues affecting NW indigenous people.
  5. An examination of the many names used to refer to indigenous peoples and their historical referents.