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Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   Voices Along the Skagit: D

 Title Abbreviation:   VOICES ALONG SKAGIT: D

 Department:    ETHNC

 Course #:    112

 Credits:    3

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    3.5

 CIP:    050202

 EPC:    n/a

 REV:    2014


 Course Description  

The history and culture of the First People in the Skagit River Watershed, from 8,000 years ago to the present. Arranged field trips to important archeological and cultural sites.

 Prerequisite  

None

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 22

Lab: 22

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Academic Social Sciences  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
EWU 101
OTHER Will probably meet GUR at 3 BIS (okays per phone)
U of W 201, 202, 311
WWU 202 Per phone

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Students will establish between original band names and the more modern tribal names.
  2. Students will understand how the cultural area concept came to be and why it has not served very well as a means to describe the First People in the Skagit Watershed.
  3. Students will study what a typical village looked like and some of the Indian names for nearby village sites.
  4. Students will study how the First People adapted to the Skagit Watershed and survived.
  5. Students will gain an understanding of Native society in the Skagit Watershed.
  6. Students will understand how diseases from Europe significantly diminished Native population and cultures in Puget Sound and the Skagit Watershed years before European explorers of American settlers arrived in the region.
  7. Students will consider the federal Indian policies from assimilation to self-determination.
  8. Students will study the demographics of Indian population in the Skagit Watershed during the last 500 years.
  9. Students will historical precedents that caused the deterioration of Indian life.
  10. Students will learn how to support Indian struggles to determine their own identity, even if they don??t fully understand their motivations.
  11. Students will learn some Lushootseed Salish vocabulary, especially as it applies to the Skagit River Watershed.
  12. Students will read and study Lushootseed oral literature as transcribed and translated by Vi Hilbert, Upper Skagit elder and renowned Lushootseed preservationist and scholar.

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

0. Application and Integration

Definition: Applying information from one or more disciplines and/or field experiences in new contexts (Outcome 0.1); developing integrated approaches or responses to personal, academic, professional, and social issues (Outcomes 0.2-0.5).

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
0.3 Identify and evaluate the relationships among different perspectives within a field of study and among different fields of study.

1. Information Literacy

Definition: Recognizing when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
1.3 Evaluate information and its sources critically.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.2 Analyze issues and develop questions within a discipline.

4. Community & Cultural Diversity

Definition: Recognizing the value of human communities and cultures from multiple perspectives through a critical understanding of their similarities and differences.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
4.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and issues associated with the diverse perspectives of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, and culture.
4.2 Understand, value and respect human differences and commonalities as they relate to issues of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and culture.
4.3 Understand the historically and socially constructed nature of—and the meanings attributed to—human differences.

5. Global & Local Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding the complexity and interdependence of, and stewardship responsibilities to, local and global communities and environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
5.1 Understand the impact of their own and other’s actions on local/global communities and environments and how those communities/environments affect them in turn.
5.2 Identify diverse communities and their shared/competing interests and develop strategies for prevention and resolution of conflict.

6. Individual Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding, managing, and taking responsibility for one’s learning and behavior in varied and changing environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
6.4 Use self-reflection to recognize and define a sense of self-identity in personal, social/gender, and/or cultural/global terms and in relationship to others.

9. Scientific Literacy

Definition: Understanding scientific principles, and analyzing and applying scientific information in a variety of contexts.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
9.4 Use scientific concepts and principles to understand the natural world, human behavior and culture, and relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world.

Course Contents

  1. Naming: The many names for the First People in the Skagit River Watershed (e.g., Native American, Indian) are representations that do not see the reality of Indians as individuals.
  2. Saltwater verses up-river adaptation: The First People in the Skagit Watershed can be described environmentally as saltwater or up-river people depending on their primary location and resource extraction techniques.
  3. Village sites in the Skagit Watershed: Before significant contact with outsiders there were between 30-50 autonomous villages forming separate groups or bands; students will study the major defining characteristics.
  4. Diversity of environment: Students will study how the First People adapted to the Skagit Watershed and survived (e.g., efficient equipment and food preservation techniques and strong social networks).
  5. The organization of Skagit (Lushootseed) society: Students will gain an understanding of Native society in the Skagit Watershed.
  6. The Columbian Exchange: The biological effects of Christopher Columbus?s discovery of the Western Hemisphere.
  7. Pivotal events in the Indian-White relations that most effected the Indians in the Skagit Watershed: Point Elliot Treaty (1855); Assimilation and the Allotment Act (1887); Indian RE-organization Act (1934); Indian Civil Rights Act (1968); Indian fishing and Boldt decisions (1974, 1975, 1995).
  8. The survival, persistence, and continuity of tribal life in the Skagit River Watershed: Students will study the demographics of Indian population during the past 500 years.
  9. Social Issues on the reservations: Economic conditions and health and education.
  10. Lushootseed Salish vocabulary, especially as it applies to the Skagit River Watershed.
  11. Lushootseed oral literature as transcribed and translated by Vi Hilbert, Upper Skagit elder and renowned Lushootseed preservationist and scholar.