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Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   Intro Political Science

 Title Abbreviation:   INTRO POLITICAL SCIENCE

 Department:    POLS&

 Course #:    101

 Credits:    5

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    5

 CIP:    451001

 EPC:    n/a

 REV:    2014


 Course Description  

Introduces theories, concepts, and methods appropriate to understanding how conflicts among people are resolved. Emphasizes political analysis, including comparative study of political behavior and institutions.

 Prerequisite  

None

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 55

Lab: 0

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Academic Social Sciences  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
CWU
U of W
WSU
WWU

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Use the vocabulary of political science
  2. Discuss and use a series of political concepts, such as power, authority, legitimacy, sovereignty,etc.
  3. Discuss and apply an understanding of ideology
  4. Classify and discuss several forms or structures of government
  5. Sensitize students to issues of diversity, pluralism, (projects will emphasize an understanding of multiple ways of viewing a political problem and its solutions)
  6. Compare and contrast political philosophies, systems of government (critical thinking skills) in exams or papers
  7. Read, analyze, and reflect upon political thinking, institutions and structures of government

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

0. Application and Integration

Definition: Applying information from one or more disciplines and/or field experiences in new contexts (Outcome 0.1); developing integrated approaches or responses to personal, academic, professional, and social issues (Outcomes 0.2-0.5).

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
0.3 Identify and evaluate the relationships among different perspectives within a field of study and among different fields of study.

1. Information Literacy

Definition: Recognizing when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
1.1 Determine the extent of information needed.
1.2 Access the needed information effectively, efficiently, ethically, and legally.
1.3 Evaluate information and its sources critically.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and facts related to a specific discipline.
2.2 Analyze issues and develop questions within a discipline.
2.3 Identify, interpret, and evaluate pertinent data and previous experience to reach conclusions.

3. Communication

Definition: Understanding and producing effective written, spoken, visual, and non-verbal communication.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
3.1 Recognize, read, and comprehend academic and/or professional writing.

4. Community & Cultural Diversity

Definition: Recognizing the value of human communities and cultures from multiple perspectives through a critical understanding of their similarities and differences.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
4.2 Understand, value and respect human differences and commonalities as they relate to issues of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and culture.

8. Mathematical Reasoning

Definition: Understanding and applying concepts of mathematics and logical reasoning in a variety of contexts, both academic and non-academic.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
8.3 Interpret information and reasoning expressed mathematically (for example in spreadsheets, diagrams, charts, formulas, etc.).

Course Contents

  1. Power, Authority, and Legitimacy
  2. Estrangement/Unity
  3. Inequality/Equality
  4. Stereotypes, Enemy Images, Prejudice, Discrimination
  5. Power and Government
  6. The Ends of Power
  7. The Limits on Power
  8. Quantitative Methods of Political Science
    • Models in Politics
    • Zero Sum Games
    • Non-Zero Sum Games