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Acceptable Disability Documentation

Guidelines for Documentation of physical disability

Written statement from a "qualified medical professional" which includes --

  1. a description of the "nature and extent" of the disability/disabilities,
  2. information about what tests and/or records were used to make the diagnosis,
  3. information about what effect the disability/disabilities has/have on the student's ability to access the educational process, and any limitations or special needs which should be addressed in the housing placement process,
  4. information about medications prescribed and the side effects of these medications ( if needed for identification of appropriate accommodations.)
Guidelines for Documentation of auditory/hearing impairment

Audiogram and audiology report from a "qualified medical professional" which includes information about the extent of the hearing loss and prescribed adaptive equipment (hearing aids, FM system. etc.). Audiology report must include the diagnosing professional's interpretation of the audiogram.

Guidelines for Documentation of visual impairment

Results of visual examination from a "qualified medical professional" which include correctable visual acuity and the diagnosing professional's interpretation of examination results.

Documentation of Learning Disability

Students who are seeking support services from Skagit Valley College on the basis of a diagnosed learning disability are required to submit documentation to verify eligibility. Documentation of learning disability consists of the provision of professional testing and evaluation with test report, which reflects the individual's present (adult) level of information processing, as well as present (adult) achievement level. The cost and responsibility for providing this professional assessment shall be borne by the student. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that evaluation reports are appropriate to document eligibility.

Guidelines for Documentation of Learning Disability
    The documentation must:
  1. Be prepared by a professional qualified to diagnose learning disability. This might include, but not be limited to a licensed neuropsychologist, psychologist, or school psychologist.
  2. Be comprehensive. One test alone is not acceptable for the purpose of diagnosis. The test report shall include a DSM-IVR (or subsequent edition) notation based on intake interview and testing results. Minimally, areas to be addressed must include, but not be limited to:
    1. Aptitude. Testing must have been administered at the adult learning level. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) with sub-test scores is preferred. In lieu of a WAIS-R (or subsequent WAIS), two Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) tests correlated within 15 IQ points of each other may be acceptable.
    2. Achievement. Current levels of functioning in reading, mathematics, and written language are required. The Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-educational Battery-Revised is preferred. The WRAT-R and the WRAT-III (Wide Range Achievement Test) are NOT comprehensive measures of achievement and therefore are not appropriate for documentation purposes.
    3. Information Processing. Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short and long term memory; auditory and visual perception/processing; processing speed) must be assessed.
  3. Be current. Testing must have been administered at the adult learning level. Since assessment constitutes the basis for determining academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services, it is in a student's best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation to serve as the basis for decision-making about a student's needs for accommodation in an academically competitive environment.
  4. Present clear and specific evidence, which identifies a specific learning disability and reflects the individual's present (adult) level of functioning. That is, processing and intelligence, as well as achievement in written expression, writing mechanics and vocabulary, grammar and spelling, reading comprehension and rate. Note: individual "learning styles," "learning differences," or "learning problems" in and of themselves do not constitute a learning disability.
  5. Include in the report, the exact instruments used and procedures followed to assess the learning disability. Report shall include test results (including sub-test score data); a written interpretation of the results by the professional doing the evaluation; name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator; and date(s) of testing.
  6. Provide sufficient data to support the request for the particular academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services. Requests that are not supported by documentation may not be provided without additional adequate verification.
Guidelines for Documentation of attention deficit/attention deficit-hyperactivity disorders

Statement from a "qualified professional" (physician, psychologist, or psychiatrist) which confirms diagnosis of ADD/ADHD and provides information about the diagnostic procedures used, the student's "functional limitations" in an educational setting, and medications prescribed/side effects of those medications ( if needed for identification of appropriate accommodations.)

Guidelines for Documentation of psychological disability

Written statement from a "qualified medical professional" (i.e., psychologist, psychiatrist) which includes:

  1. A description of the "nature and extent" of the disability/disabilities,
  2. Information about what tests and/or records were used to make the diagnosis,
  3. Information about what effect the disability/disabilities has/have on the student's ability to access the educational process,
  4. Information about what, if any, medications are prescribed and the side effects of those medications, ( if needed for identification of appropriate accommodations.)