Skagit Valley College logo

Catalog Course Search Details

 Course Title:   Parks Law Enforcement Academy (PLEA) Module 3

 Title Abbreviation:   PLEA - MODULE 3

 Department:    CJ

 Course #:    243

 Credits:    6

 Variable:     No

 IUs:    6.5

 CIP:    n/a

 EPC:    n/a

 REV:    2013


 Course Description  

Introduction to legal principles, criminal and Constitutional laws, arrest/search/seizure/rules of evidence, and mechanics of arrest. Emphasizes civil and criminal liability, individual rights, and natural and cultural resources law and protection. Focuses on courtroom testimony and demeanor and case preparation.

 Prerequisite  

Prerequisite: Extensive background and criminal history check/drug analysis and Dept Chair/Committee Approval.

Additional Course Details

Contact Hours (based on 11 week quarter)

Lecture: 55

Lab: 22

Other: 0

Systems: 0

Clinical: 0


Intent: Distribution Requirement(s) Status:  

Vocational Preparatory Required for certificate  

Equivalencies At Other Institutions

Other Institution Equivalencies Table
Institution Course # Remarks
N/A

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the elements of, significance, and differences between the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
  2. Recite the titles of various case laws that established precedent for the state and federal governments.
  3. Understand the parallels between the U.S. and Washington State Constitutions.
  4. Discern between the Articles of the U.S. Constitution and what groundwork they laid for government.
  5. Differentiate between U.S. Codes that cover civil rights challenges for actions of local and state officers, and case law that covers civil rights challenges for actions of federal officers.
  6. Discuss Title 16, 18, 36, and other US Codes as they apply to Federal Officers.
  7. Recite appropriate natural and cultural resource laws that exist in the Archaelogical Resources Protection Act (ARPA) and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).
  8. Develop written notes, technical reports, and other written documents to support testimony in court.
  9. Give testimony effectively in a court of law.
  10. Recite the rules for a speedy trial in Washington State.
  11. Understand reasons for objection in courtrooms.
  12. Perform searches and arrests with knowledge of consent, and within and outside the scope of a warrant requirement based on several factors.
  13. Apply for a search/arrest warrant, and inventory and impound a vehicle.
  14. Have a working knowledge of the Lacey Act and its coverage.

General Education Learning Values & Outcomes

Revised August 2008 and affects outlines for 2008 year 1 and later.

1. Information Literacy

Definition: Recognizing when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
1.1 Determine the extent of information needed.
1.2 Access the needed information effectively, efficiently, ethically, and legally.
1.3 Evaluate information and its sources critically.
1.4 Evaluate issues (for example economic, legal, historic, social) surrounding the use of information.
1.5 Effectively integrate and use information ethically and legally to accomplish a specific purpose.

2. Critical Thinking

Definition: The ability to think critically about the nature of knowledge within a discipline and about the ways in which that knowledge is constructed and validated and to be sensitive to the ways these processes often vary among disciplines.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
2.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and facts related to a specific discipline.
2.2 Analyze issues and develop questions within a discipline.
2.3 Identify, interpret, and evaluate pertinent data and previous experience to reach conclusions.
2.4 Evaluate decisions by analyzing outcomes and the impact of actions.
2.5 Identify similarities and differences in the ways in which data is collected and analyzed in different disciplines.
2.6 Recognize how the value and biases in different disciplines can affect the ways in which data is analyzed.
2.7 Identify and evaluate connections and relationships among disciplines.
2.8 Describe how one’s own preconceptions, biases and values affect one’s response to new and ambiguous situations.
2.9 Apply and/or create problem-solving strategies to successfully adapt to unpredictable and/or changing environments.

3. Communication

Definition: Understanding and producing effective written, spoken, visual, and non-verbal communication.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
3.1 Recognize, read, and comprehend academic and/or professional writing.
3.2 Recognize, produce and demonstrate appropriate interpersonal, group, and public speaking skills.
3.3 Demonstrate effective listening skills.
3.4 Produce academic and/or professional writing and integrate it into written and spoken projects.
3.5 Recognize, comprehend, and use non-verbal behaviors appropriate to a given context.
3.6 Recognize, comprehend, and use visual communication appropriate to a given context.
3.7 Adapt communication to diverse audiences and media.

4. Community & Cultural Diversity

Definition: Recognizing the value of human communities and cultures from multiple perspectives through a critical understanding of their similarities and differences.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
4.1 Identify and express concepts, terms, and issues associated with the diverse perspectives of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, and culture.
4.2 Understand, value and respect human differences and commonalities as they relate to issues of race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and culture.
4.3 Understand the historically and socially constructed nature of—and the meanings attributed to—human differences.
4.4 Demonstrate effective communication across differences in human communities and cultures.
4.5 Adapt to and function effectively in communities and cultures different from one's own.

5. Global & Local Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding the complexity and interdependence of, and stewardship responsibilities to, local and global communities and environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
5.1 Understand the impact of their own and other’s actions on local/global communities and environments and how those communities/environments affect them in turn.
5.2 Identify diverse communities and their shared/competing interests and develop strategies for prevention and resolution of conflict.
5.3 Understand the consequences of choices as they relate to local/global community and environmental issues.
5.4 Understand the concept of local/global stewardship, and its ethical components, to communities and environments.
5.5 Demonstrate ethical practices as part of stewardship to local/global communities and environments.

6. Individual Awareness & Responsibility

Definition: Understanding, managing, and taking responsibility for one’s learning and behavior in varied and changing environments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
6.2 Demonstrate standards of professionalism in manner, appearance, and setting appropriate to the context, including the classroom, workplace, and community.
6.3 Apply successful organizational strategies of planning, goal setting, prioritizing, resolving conflict, and managing time to specific goals and/or projects.

9. Scientific Literacy

Definition: Understanding scientific principles, and analyzing and applying scientific information in a variety of contexts.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
9.4 Use scientific concepts and principles to understand the natural world, human behavior and culture, and relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world.

10. Technology

Definition: Understanding the role of technology in society and using technology appropriately and effectively.

Outcomes: Students will be able to . . .
10.2 Demonstrate an understanding of legal, ethical, and environmental issues in the use and misuse of technology.
10.3 Use technology appropriate to the context and task to effectively retrieve and manage information, solve problems, and facilitate communication.

Course Contents

  1. Constitutional Law.
  2. Officer Liability.
  3. Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations.
  4. Federal Criminal Law.
  5. Washington State Criminal Law.
  6. First Amendment.
  7. Fourth Amendment.
  8. Fifth and Sixth Amendment.
  9. Federal Court Procedures.
  10. Courtroom Evidence.
  11. Courtroom Testimony.
  12. Natural Resource Law.
  13. Cultural Resource Law (ARPA and NAGRPA).